Quick tip: Although some of us still have cars old enough to have tape decks, or keep actual physical radios around to leave on for our dogs while we’re gone (just me?), you’d probably do well to also provide a digital download card so fans can love the nostalgia while being able to listen in the modern age.

The queen of jazz has a beautiful point here and it’s such a great reminder that “love is the thing.” Isn’t that why we play music? We freakin’ love it and it makes us feel alive. We play to empty clubs, bare our souls, and write about our broken hearts for the love of it. And isn’t it amazing that you’ve found something you love? There are a lot of people out there who have no idea what their passion is — who may work dead-end jobs or feel lost. I used to be one. But when I found music, it was like finding God. I’m not religious, but I can see how people get into it. It feels amazing to have something you love, something nobody can take away from you. And to me, that’s the key to a happy and successful life.

Here are a few tips for upping your practicing game every day. But getting ready for a recording session requires doing things a little differently, so here are a few quick tips for how to make the most of your time in the studio:

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In several interviews, Sandison and Eoin reveal how they love using old reel-to-reel, four-track, and cassette tape machines as pseudo-preamps to impart a certain sound. The aim was to drive the inputs on this old tech and harness its audio downsampling, imprinting a sense of nostalgia and decay right into the tracking process of the recording.

And yet, for the most part, it is a foreign way of thinking to our own: Much religious meaning in music today is practiced, and heard, as an all-encompassing, multi-faith spirituality rather than this Baroque-era sense that more specifically imagines “theology heard as sound.”

You already know that Austin is a mecca of musical talent and endless opportunities during SXSW but it’s also a pretty incredible year-round music scene, and partly because of the large student presence. If you’re familiar with SXSW, you’re likely aware of the rows of live music venues on Sixth Street, with shows running throughout the week. In addition, it has the Pecan Street Festival, which features five stages for live music, as well as performances by the Austin Symphony Orchestra. With several college campuses throughout the city, you shouldn’t have any trouble finding a venue and an audience if you play your marketing cards right!

Krumhansl proposed that we’ve heard enough songs in major keys to be able to pick up on what songs in major do, and how they should sound. Just like when you watch enough spy movies, you can basically predict what’s supposed to happen in the spy movie you’re about to watch. Cui says, “I’m assuming that most people hearing ‘I Wanna Dance With Somebody’ would know that it’s in major even though they might not know it’s called major.”

Ellisa Sun cuts out her heart and leaves it on the stage — which is why she never wears white. Currently on her first national tour, Ellisa is showing she has what it takes to make it on her own. Just a guitar, a 30-foot RV, and an insatiable desire to perform. Raised in Los Angeles and (until recently) based in the San Francisco Bay Area, her sound is honest, heartfelt, and textured, combining elements of jazz, soul, and pop.

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Hunter Farris runs the Song Appeal podcast, which focuses on the psychology behind why we like the music we like. His podcast on music theory and music psychology has appealed broadly enough for Hunter to speak at Comic-Con 2018, and is instructive enough to be used as homework by a music theory professor. He currently teaches people to play piano by ear and make their own arrangements of other people’s music.

From the influential mid-century Czech composer Bohuslav Martinů, we have his Fantasia for theremin, oboe, string quartet, and piano. Composed in the summer of 1944 and premiered the next year in New York, this work may not be one of Martinů’s better-known pieces; but, nevertheless, it’s exciting to see a composer exploring a new and exciting instrument so late in their career. With the microtonal possibilities of this instrument, the entire tonal spectrum is your oyster, and Martinů’s off-kilter expressive notation really brings out the depth of beauty and unrest that this instrument is capable of producing.

This post is part of Flypaper’s Home Recording Week, where we’re sharing tips and insights from our community on home recording and production workflow. Read our featured articles here, or sign up for our weekly newsletter to make sure you never miss a beat!

The Who’s penchant for rule-breaking, as seen in this performance, no doubt influenced the ethics of all the proto-punk acts that came after them. If anti-establishment antics become the norm, push it a step farther and never stop. Well done, Keith.

After a piece is fully composed, I turn to technology for the organization and administrative side of things: Making charts, organizing rehearsals, emailing harsh MIDI demos to everyone while simultaneously watching Columbo in the background.