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“To B, or not to B.” That is… not a question this year, because none of our songs were in the key of B! It was E♭— minor, specifically — that was our huge winner this year (black keys on the piano in general, really), with low showings for the keys of D and E, once again proving that nobody writes Top 40 pop songs on their guitars anymore.

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Grants for community art projects

All of our mentored online courses come with six weeks of 1-on-1 professional coaching and feedback on your work. It’s like having a personal trainer, but for music! Whether you’re interested in diving deep into a production-related topic like Songwriting for Producers, Advanced Mix Techniques, or Intro to Making Music in Logic Pro X, or just to work with a Soundfly Mentor directly to achieve a musical goal specific to you, we can help you get there!

Modes and Key Signatures have a variety of different characteristics and are great for outside-the-box songwriting. Here’s a cheat sheet to remember them!

Again this element can be taken as lightly or seriously as you want — from t-shirts and jeans to tuxedos to fully customized outfits, masks, wigs, props, etc. — but it’s always something you need to be aware of. A small bit of effort, like for example, synchronizing your dress code with the rest of the band, can go a long way.

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Based on a narrative from the avant-garde writer Frank Wedekind, Lulu details the rise, fall, and violent death of a sexually adventurous dancer (murdered by Jack the Ripper, no less). It shocked readers by showing true love and romantic opportunism side by side, criticizing what Wedekind saw as the hypocritical bourgeois attitude towards sexuality at the time. The story has continued to resonate throughout the years, and the story’s place at the center of Metallica and Lou Reed’s controversial collaboration only speaks to its ability to both entice and polarize audiences.

Best gangsta rap albums

Touring is great. But it can very quickly turn into exhaustive, monotonous work. Here are 10 great tips to keep things interesting and fun on the road.

A bad relationship can look like anything from unresolved issues between you and a bandmate or collaborator, to being banned from a local venue in your hometown. Not prioritizing and maintaining your musical relationships can lead to major problems in your career, like people in your band quitting suddenly on tour, a bad reputation in your local scene, etc. Burning bridges seems logical in the heat of the moment, but they can come back to haunt you.

In several interviews, Sandison and Eoin reveal how they love using old reel-to-reel, four-track, and cassette tape machines as pseudo-preamps to impart a certain sound. The aim was to drive the inputs on this old tech and harness its audio downsampling, imprinting a sense of nostalgia and decay right into the tracking process of the recording.

Soundfly welcomes new voices each month to offer unique perspectives, shine a light on unexpected musical worlds, and help our readers find their sound.

“Happier”: Wait, no… what are you… no! Not the dog, come on, man, not the dog, what are you doing to me, Marshmello? Okay, so here’s a form I’m not adequately equipped to categorize or compare to anything else: what’s stumping me is what to do with the three-bar space in between the pre-chorus and the solid chorus/refrain that’s introduced at the beginning. For now, I’m lumping it in with the chorus as part of a chorus variation. But you could also think of it as an extended part of the pre-chorus, especially as its lyric is taken from it. Or, I guess we could even call it an “interlude.” It’s slippery. I have to highlight the half-bridge that ends the song — you almost never see half-bridges.